Nearly a million young people living with parents hidden from Household formation figures

Guardian

Shows you cant simply rollback one census, it goes back over 20 years.  Civitas report here.

Nearly a million more young adults are living with their parents than was the case two decades ago, a study has found.

The figures, in a report by the cross-party thinktank Civitas, will fuel concerns that too little is being done to protect young people from Britain’s housing crisis.

The proportion of people aged 20 to 34 who live with their parents has risen from 19.48% in 1997, equating to 2.4 million people, to 25.91% in 2017, equating to 3.4 million.

The report says the findings have profound implications for the government’s housebuilding targets. It also notes a “collapse in single living” among those who do move out of their parental home, as young people are now far more likely to be living with partners or friends.

This has implications for how many homes will need to be built in the future. The government develops its housebuilding targets using household projections, calculating how many households are likely to be formed in the future by looking at patterns over recent decades. Bentley said if the government failed to acknowledge the drop in the number of young people moving out or living alone, “it will reinforce an undersupply for housing for decades”.

The growth in young people living with their parents has been strongest in London, which saw a 41% increase between 1996-98 and 2014-15.

How can this be reflected in planning? The easiest way is to model those aged over 30 living with their parents having the same propensity to form a household as in 2002.  This could be done very quickly to produce variant forecasts using current demographic data..