Inside Housing – East of England Plans Falling 41% short of Household Growth

Inside Housing 

English councils will fall almost 30,000 homes short of meeting housing need each year under the government’s reformed planning system.

 Figures obtained by Inside Housing this week show councils are planning for 183,000 homes a year in their adopted or emerging local plans. But government household projection data states 212,500 new homes are needed each year to keep up with demand.

This means the nine English regions will fall 14 per cent short of meeting housing need. The figures will fuel fears that the government’s localism agenda, which ended central housing targets in favour of locally set development plans, could exacerbate the housing crisis.

Pippa Read, policy leader at National Housing Federation, warned that councils ‘must robustly assess the homes that are needed in their areas and plan how they will meet this demand’.

‘Not doing so would be too costly when house building is at its lowest peacetime level since the 1920s, hundreds of thousands of new households are being created each year and millions of people remain on housing waiting lists,’ she said.

Councils have until April to draw up local plans under the government’s new national planning policy framework. Local plans allocate land for housing and justify the scale of development over a period of 15 to 20 years.

The region with the least hope of meeting housing demand is the east of England, where councils are planning just 19,000 homes a year despite needing around 32,000 annually according to government predictions.

John Acres, residential business development director at planning consultancy Turley Associates, said political pressure means councils are less willing to approve development. ‘Local authorities are looking afresh at housing need [in drawing up local plans] and there’s a huge discrepancy between the housing need and what they are prepared to provide,’ he said.

Trevor Miller, shadow cabinet member for strategic housing at Chelmsford Council, which is planning 808 homes a year compared with 1,000 homes cited in household projections, said: ‘Our problem is one of finding the land for housing and the finance for it. There’s plans for some housing in the pipeline at the moment but it’s never as much as we would like.’

Housing supply in numbers

Region Adopted core strategy Annual average from adopted core strategy Emerging core strategy Annual average from emerging core strategy Annual average total of adopted and emerging core strategy Annual household projections Difference between adopted/emerging core strategy and household projections % difference between plans &  household projections
North East 34343 1920 65925 3376 5296 5840 -544 -9
North West 155508 9091 206074 11744 20835 19040 1795 9
Yorkshire & Humberside 131710 6658 245025 14105 20763 27120 -6357 -23
East Midlands 135300 6695 222275 11909 18604 18920 -316 -2
West Midlands 139200 7240 195433 9845 17085 18440 -1355 -7
East of England 288920 13534 119596 5643 19177 32240 -13063 -41
South East of England 230652 12407 282305 14053 26460 35400 -8940 -25
South West 134605 7132 305680 15394 22526 26200 -3674 -14
London 322150 32210 32210 29280 2930 10
Total 1572388 96887     182956 212480 -29524 -14

3 thoughts on “Inside Housing – East of England Plans Falling 41% short of Household Growth

  1. Teignbridge has just cut Band E from its housing list cutting the need for homes in general anf affordables in particular by 39%. Wonder what revised figures would be if every district did that?

  2. What’s the point of setting this overall number and forcing local authorities to produce plans allocating land, if nobody wants to invest in building them? A somewhat simplistic question I know, but I’m obviously missing something here when it come to the reality of delivery.
    These government figures are no more than smoke and mirrors. Whatever number of houses you build and no matter how desperate people are for somewhere of their own to live, unless they can afford to either buy it or rent it, it’s (as in the title of the show I’m currently watching on TV, Pointless).
    The government are seeking to shift the blame from those who should be managing this at the national level, to it those who can only manage the demand locally.

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